handstands

Our Coaches Top 4 Insta Follows

From time to time we all get stuck down the rabbit hole of Instagram, there are so many people out there, doing great things, inspiring others, teaching valuable lessons, using their platforms in meaningful ways to connect with others. 

Today we want to share with you some of our favourite Instagram accounts of people we believe are there doing great things for the fitness industry in the gymnastics and movement space.

Court's recommendation:
1. Hunter Cook
Hunter is doing some very cool shit. He is so strong and mobile...the things he can do with his body is incredible. He put's out a lot of content which is very applicable to our member and client training.
Check out Hunter Cook  

Mel's recommendation:
2. Laura Novack
Laura is not strictly doing gymnastics but she does calisthenics, she comes up with some really cool creative ideas. This always helps us come up with new creative ideas for the DS Squad programs.
Check out Laura Novack
 

Ev's recommendation:
3. Carl Paoli
I follow Carl because he genuinely seeks to make a connection with people through his movement practice. He challenges people to think, explore and grow when interacting with his content as opposed to blindly following or subscribing to his program.
Check out Carl Paoli

Kat's recommendation:
4. Gemma Cheung
This girl does gymnastics, pole dancing, yoga, lyra. Seriously...what can't she do. Not to mention, she just had a baby, which has not stopped her fitness pursuit.
Check out Gemma Cheung

We hope you enjoy following these superstars as much as we do.

4 MOST IMPORTANT THINGS CLIENTS NEED FROM THEIR COACH

As a coach you are teaching clients to achieve new skills, helping them improve strength and performance. On a daily basis you are being asked for your professional expertise and guidance on learning, correcting or progressing to pull ups, handstand and ring skills.

What does your client need from you in order to achieve a gymnastics skill specific goal?

You may think the answer is more progressions, coaches eyes, different cues. At one point, I thought so too.

Have you ever provided a client with cues and progressions, you turn your back and realise they revert back to their old ways. Seeming to disregard your expertise. Why is this happening? In my quest to understand the learning process better I read Josh Kaufman’s book “The First 20 Hours.” The thing that struck a chord was that learning and skill acquisition are very different things. I started applying this to coaching.

LET’S TAKE THIS COMMON SCENARIO:

Sally kicks up to quite aggressively to a handstand, back to wall, feet touching, back in a slight arch with head sticking out, she fatigues quickly. Sally has been doing this for 12 months and asks for a progressions to a freestanding handstand.

You watch and realise there are number of things going wrong, she doesn't have the correct body position, body awareness is lacking, timing is off and needs to improve her strength.

If you are adequately prepared to help her the goal, you need to set her on the right path or send her to someone that can.

 

You (the coach) need to teach the client about the Why, How, Help them Identify Mistakes and finally Practice.

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Learning and Practicing

  1. Why- Why is this important? Why must it be done this way? First comes learning, this includes an understanding of why it is important for a skill to be done a particular way. If the client doesn’t understand why, they will find little motivation take on your advice. Why are you asking the client to move in a particular way? Is it to progress them onto a higher level skill? Safety?

  2. How- How are they going to change what they are currently doing. What are they missing, strength, mobility, body awareness? All of the above? Provide them with positional drills, mobility, strength and always link it back to the reason why. This will emphasise the importance.

  3. Identifying their own mistakes- Can they feel when they have performed a drill correctly or incorrectly. Now that the client is starting to get a better understanding of what is required. Ask them question, "can you feel what happened there, what could you have done better?"

  4. Practice, practice, practice- Repeating the set drills, progressions, mobility, strength. This is only complete once the steps above have been thoroughly understood.

If you’re a Coach or PT and are guessing your way through gymnastics coaching join our Coaches Gymnastics Classes at Bondi Junction and Marrickville. You will learn new skills yourself and become a better coach to your clients.

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How you do something, is how you do everything

Starting gymnastics young taught us many lessons in discipline. Alarm clocks set at 4:30am, juggling school and training as well as sacrificing social events.

 

Generally, if you are putting in more than 10+ hours of training per week into an athletic endeavour you are showing some level of commitment to your goal. However, time alone as a measure of discipline is limiting. You can pour hours upon hours into an endeavour and but unless your mind is in the right place and your practice is extremely deliberate- you may see some average results but never discover your true potential.

 

We were taught that our success didn’t depend on purely just showing up and going through the motions. Our effort was noticed in every single movement we performed in a session. This meant perfect alignment in stretches, complete body tension during core work and our attitude towards training partners.  It even meant standing and walking was graceful and emphasis was placed on correct posture.

 

Two important lessons

  1. It’s not what you do, it is how you do it.

  2. How you do something, is how you do everything.

 

If you were "that" girl who needed the coach to be there watching and keeping you accountable for every piece of your training. Everyone knew it was only a matter of time before you gave up on something important. Your advanced goals would slip from your grasp and it would be because the correct attitude wasn’t a part of the small actions, so it wasn’t a part of you.

 

Patience towards goals was a given in our gymnastics experience. There was no skipping ahead and attempting skills outside of an athlete’s strength capability. Not even once. You were never allowed to ask your coach if you could attempt a skill because ‘you wanted to.’ More importantly, none of us wanted to skip ahead. We didn’t want injuries and we wanted the decisions to be left up to the coach instead of our ego. There was no sense of urgency in our training environment. However what it did have was a deep sense of importance and seriousness.

 

That small action and drill we were performing was just another piece being added to a future masterpiece.

 

This is something now ingrained in our teaching philosophy and it is something we are very proud of.

Proper progression and patience are keys to success and the ones who are rushing ahead to stay at the pace of somebody else or a false idea of their own capability are destined for injury and don’t succeed in our program.

 

Questions to ask yourself

  1. Are you in a training environment that supports proper progression?

  2. Is your practice deliberate or random?


Need some guidance on your current training? Request a discovery call below & discover 3 small actions you can take NOW to get more out of your training sessions.

 

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